Amazing cicada life cycle!

Sir David Attenborough´s “Life in the Undergrowth” – BBC Wildlife

Cicada

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cicadasare insects in the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha (which was formerly included in the now invalid suborder called “Homoptera”). Cicadas live in temperate-to-tropical climates where they are among the most-widely recognized of all insects, mainly due to their large size and unique sound. Cicadas are often colloquially called locusts, although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are various species of swarming grasshopper. Cicadas are related to leafhoppers and spittlebugs.

Cicadas are benign to humans under normal circumstances and do not bite or sting in a true sense, but may mistake a person’s arm or other part of their body for a tree or plant limb and attempt to feed. Cicadas can cause damage to several cultivated crops, shrubs, and trees, mainly in the form of scarring left on tree branches while the females lay their eggs deep in branches.

Many people around the world regularly eat cicadas. They are known to have been eaten in Ancient Greece as well as China, Malaysia, Burma, Latin America, and the Congo. Female cicadas are prized for being meatier. Shells of cicadas are employed in the traditional medicines of China.

Symbolism

The cicada has represented insouciance since classical antiquity. Jean de La Fontaine began his collection of fables Les fables de La Fontaine with the story La Cigale et la Fourmi (The Cicada and the Ant) based on one of Aesop‘s fables: in it the cicada spends the summer singing while the ant stores away food, and finds herself without food when the weather turns bitter.

Note:I have added a link to the fabulous La Fontaine’s Fables. Don´t fail to read it. Oscar