Global Sea Level Rises

 

Science climate change

Here’s What Using the World’s Remaining Fossil Fuels Would Do to the Antarctic Ice Shelf

ANTARCTICA - 2007/11/20: Antarctica, Scotia Sea, Near South Georgia, Waves Crashing On Tabular Iceberg With Cave. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
ANTARCTICA – 2007/11/20: Antarctica, Scotia Sea, Near South Georgia, Waves Crashing On Tabular Iceberg With Cave. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Sea levels around the world could rise by more than 150 ft. from Antarctic ice melt

Expending Earth’s remaining fossil fuels resources would eliminate the ice shelf in Antarctica and lead to dramatic global sea level rises, according to new research.

Sea levels around the world have been on the rise for years, but ice from Antarctica has contributed a relatively small fraction of water little to that total. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, shows how that will change if humans continue to burn fossil fuels.

“To put it bluntly, if we burn it all, we melt it all,” said study author Ricarda Winkelmann, a professor of climate systems analysis at the Potsdam Institute For Climate Impact Research. Read more.