Scientists race to stop an amphibian-killing fungus from entering the United States

newts

Eastern newts are one species that could suffer losses if Bsal enters the U.S.

Alberto López

Scientists race to stop an amphibian-killing fungus from entering the United States

By Patrick MonahanFeb. 12, 2016 , 4:00 PM

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Commission banned the import of 201 species of salamander into the United States, and between state boundaries. The move is intended to keep out the deadly fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, or Bsal, sister species of the Bd fungus that has caused the extinction or decline of countless amphibian species. Today, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (which publishes Science), four amphibian biologists talked about what they learned from 20 years of the fight against Bd—and why restricting the salamander pet trade was the best way to keep history from repeating itself. Read more.